Posts Tagged ‘art education’

Collection Mystery Drawing…Who is the Artist?

 
WAM Collection mystery drawing...who is the artist?

WAM Collection mystery drawing...who is the artist?

Stieg Larsson’s investigative journalist Mikael Blomkvist definitely has talents I don’t possess.  For the last two weeks I have been trying intermittently to determine who drew this portrait.  It came to us as part of the Etta and Claribel Cone collection in 1950 and has been attributed to Mersyes based on the inscription. Unfortunately no such artist exists. Is the inscription a signature or a title? The drawing is in the style of Jacques Villon, whose work the Cones collected and the Weatherspoon owns, but he typically signed his work. Likewise the inscription is not in the style of Jean Metzinger, a fellow cubist. The drawing is adhered to a mat that has the words “Safsa (Trinini)” inscribed on it (by whom?) as well as the date 1926. The face looks Algerian or Moroccan and I’ve learned that there is a place in Algeria called Safsaf, but what does Trinini mean? The only other clue is the word Tefúgahe (?) inscribed in pencil on the drawing’s upper right corner. I’m not giving up yet, but I hope some Lisbeth Salander will read this post and provide some much needed help.

UPDATE:

Mystery Solved!!

This was a good week for art sleuths out there, and thus for WAM.  While visiting the Museum for another project, paper conservator Jane Sugarman looked at the mystery drawing and figured out that the inscription did not read “Trinini,” but rather the country Tunisia. From that, I was able to decipher part of the upper right inscription to read “Gafsa.”  The town of Gafsa, also spelled Qafsah, has been around since Roman times when it was known as Capsa.

The next day, I got a post from the Ackland Art Museum’s Chief Curator, Peter Nisbet, who identified the signature as “Medgyes.” Better known as a furniture and stage designer than as an artist, Ladislas Medgyes was born in Hungary but worked in New York from the 1920s until his death sometime in the late 1940s.

Many, many thanks to both Jane and Peter for helping identify this wonderful drawing and for confirming that a career in the visual arts is never dull.

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WAM Teen Art Guides Get Guilford County Art Teachers Talking

 
WAM Teen Art Guides were present to lead their first official tour of the season

WAM Teen Art Guides were present to lead their first official tour of the season

On Thursday, November 17, eight of the WAM Teen Art Guides were present to lead their first official tour of the season—for the Guilford County School’s middle and secondary art teachers. Students worked in teams to engage the teachers in looking at and discovering the art works in Persona: a Body in Parts—an exhibition about identity, how we present ourselves to others and how others perceive us.

Being an effective tour guide is not as simple as it may appear. One has to know how to ask the right questions to get people looking—and then talking. One has to be an active and sensitive listener to know when to impart information.

WAM’s Teen Art Guides are from Grimsley High School and Weaver Academy.  Some have been Guides for almost a year, and others started with the group in October.  In addition to learning how to get others as excited about art as they themselves are, these teens are having a variety of experiences in the museum. Over the course of the year they will have the opportunity to meet museum staff, interview visiting artists, create audio guides for visitors, and volunteer at a variety of fun museum events. Be sure to look for them when you visit the Weatherspoon!

Pictured left to right:  Claire Foust, Kevin Walser, Olya  Sheikina, Shamira Azlan, Matthew Ribar, and Maura Hatzman.  Not pictured: Emery Kiefer, Angele Gray

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Taking a Closer Look

 
UNCG Professor K. Porter Aichele with students viewing works from the WAM Collection

UNCG Professor K. Porter Aichele with students viewing works from the WAM Collection

The Weatherspoon Art Museum’s permanent collection provides a unique resource for UNCG faculty and the courses they teach. With advance planning, faculty may request that works from the collection be presented to their classes for an up-close experience.

Recently, Professor K. Porter Aichele requested a viewing of works from the collection for the course Research on Women Artists since the 1976 Exhibition. Students were able to present research alongside their chosen artwork, which provided the opportunity for direct observation and elicited further discussion.

One of the students remarked about the artwork she selected to research for her paper: “I just needed to see it. I had an image, but it’s not the same.”

In the images above, participants draw close to Julie Heffernan’s Accumulated Self Portrait, 1996, to take in the presenter’s comment that at first glance we see “a world that looks tame and nurturing but which, upon closer inspection, is much darker.”

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“Persona” article by Tom Patterson in the Winston-Salem Journal

 
Tom Patterson article on the exhibition "Persona" in the Winston-Salem Journal

Tom Patterson article on the exhibition "Persona" in the Winston-Salem Journal

Read a recent article from the Winston-Salem Journal‘s Tom Patterson on the Weatherspoon exhibition Persona: A Body in Parts which is on view at the museum until December 11, 2011.

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Open to Art

 

Our State August 2011 issue about WAM

Our State August 2011 issue about WAM

New article in the August 2011 issue of Our State magazine by Lorraine Ahearn.

“In 70 years of collecting modern art, the Weatherspoon Art Museum in Greensboro has become nationally known for selecting works of enduring value….”

Read more by linking to article.

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