Posts Tagged ‘UNCG’

2012 Sustainability Short Film Competition Awards

 
Voices of the Gulf

"Voices of the Gulf - A Message to North Carolina"

A message from Sara Dorsey with the UNCG Sustainability Committee:

We had a great evening on Thursday at the Weatherspoon Art Museum—great entries, great food, great music, great messages from all of our film makers.  Here are links for the entries we had this year with links for those of you who could not come…or maybe for you who could come and want to share them with your friends.

First of all, a heartfelt thanks to our wonderful sponsors: Barnabas Network, Fund 4 Democratic Communities, Goat Lady Dairy, Sierra Club, Tate Street CoffeeUNCG Office of Leadership and Service Learning, UNCG Sustainability CommitteeWeatherspoon Art Museum and Zaytoon.

Third Prize went to Contagious Media Productions for “Flora” by Mike Dickens and Caitlin Rhyne.  A poetic, thought-provoking narrative on preserving our natural resources. It is on Vimeo and was created for the 48 Hour Go Green Film Competition last year.  This year their 48 Hour entry is “Fragile Creatures“—go here to watch and vote—March 25 is the last day, so vote SOON!

Second Prize went to “Sustainability For Everyone: Rethinking Piedmont Ideas about Living Green and Local”—Andrew J. Young, et al. This film is about about the cultural sustainability of the Montagnard traditions in Greensboro which was introduced by the impressive young woman, Lek Siu.

First Prize went to “Voices From the Gulf – A Message to North Carolina”—Todd Tinkham, Molly Matlock, Ben Turney, and Bill L. Elias. A moving call from Gulf Coast citizens to people in North Carolina to resist giving in to political pressures for off shore drilling—this is part of a larger project called “Dispersed” they are working on that includes the issue of fracking as well.

Special thanks to the musicians, Aaron Bond and Melvin Holland and to Zaytoon for delicious food and drink and to the wonderful Weatherspoon for hosting us!

Huzzah to all for an excellent 2012 Third Annual UNCG Sustainability Shorts Film Competition.

— Sarah Dorsey

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Tom Burckhardt Gift

 
"Whiteout" by Tom Burckhardt

Tom Burckhardt, "Whiteout", 2006, ink and digitized image on paper, 36 x 80 in. Gift of Lysiane Luong Grooms and Red Grooms, 2012.

The Weatherspoon Art Museum is pleased to announce that it just received a gift of a work on paper by the artist, Tom Burckhardt.  Burckhardt was a Falk Visiting Artist last semester, and his solo exhibition closed on Jan. 8th.  The new acquisition, entitled Whiteout, is unlike the works that were on display.  More narrative and descriptive, but equally conceptual, it features the artist in a snow-covered, Asian-inspired landscape contemplating an easel painting and by extension, the act and purpose of painting.

The work on paper was donated by the artist Red Grooms, whose work was recently on view in Altered States & Visions and for whom Burckhardt worked for many years as a studio assistant, and his wife Lysiane Luong.

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Bellocq’s Storyville: New Orleans at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

 
E.J. Bellocq, "Girl Lying on Grass Chaise Lounge"

E.J. Bellocq, "Girl Lying on Grass Chaise Lounge", c. 1911-13, gelatin silver print, 8 x 9 7/8 in. Museum purchase with funds from the Benefactors Fund, 1973.

Although he was wealthy from a family inheritance and considered a part of the elite of New Orleans, E.J. Bellocq made his living mostly by taking photographic records of landmarks, ships and machinery for local companies.  He gained posthumous fame, however, for his personal photographs of the hidden underside of local life, notably the prostitutes of Storyville, New Orleans’ legalized red light district. Although it is possible that these images were made for commercial purposes—photographs of prostitutes were included in Blue Books, advertisements created by the city’s brothels—it seems more likely that Bellocq personally knew the women in his photographs, given their ease with the camera and their willingness to pose and sometimes even feign for it. Upon his death in 1949, Bellocq’s possessions, along with the disreputable photographs, were given to his brother, Leon, a Jesuit priest. When the photographs were discovered years later, many of the women’s faces had been scratched out. Initially it was speculated that Leon scratched the photos upon receiving them, but this is no longer believed since the damage was done in the emulsion rather than on the glass plate negatives.

The young E.J. Bellocq

Young E.J. Bellocq. photo courtesy of Tulane Special Collections.

The district of Storyville was created in 1897 when Alderman Sidney Story decided that the expansion of brothels in New Orleans needed to stop because they drove down building and family values. Knowing full well that banning prostitution would be ineffective, Story set out to regulate it. He created a thirty-five block area in which prostitution was legal, and banned it in the rest of the city. This area quickly became one of the most scandalous red-light districts in the United States, and much to the ire of Alderman Story, came to bear his name.

Storyville and Bellocq himself, have become infamous symbols of New Orleans at the turn of the century. Several movies, including the 1992 film, Storyville, and the 1978 film starring Brooke Shields and Susan Sarandon, Pretty Baby, focus on this particularly notorious and fascinating part of New Orleans’ history. This photograph by Bellocq will be on display until April 8, 2012 in the exhibition To What Purpose? Photography as Art and Documentary at Weatherspoon Art Museum.

Post written by Stephanie Krysiak, a second year History Master’s student at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Thanks to Elaine Gustafson, Curator of Collections, Weatherspoon Art Museum.

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Great Depression Era Photography

 
Titus Oakley family stripping, tying, and grading tobacco in their bedroom...

Marion Post Wolcott, "Titus Oakley family stripping, tying, and grading tobacco in their bedroom...", 1939

The photograph of Titus Oakley and his family shows the necessity of a family working together to make ends meet. During the Great Depression, this was commonplace; families depended on the labor of all members to survive. Men felt responsible for supporting their families, and in the wake of the depression, were troubled by their inability to be the sole providers. Whether they could provide or not, men were still considered by society to be the head of the household. This belief is evident in through the photo of the Oakley family because Titus is the only person whose name is recorded. Even in later photographs, which focus on his wife and daughter and do not include him, his wife and daughter are not given names. They are defined in relation to him.

Marion Post Wolcott, the photographer of this piece, was hired by the Farmer Security Administration (FSA) during the Great Depression to document the lives of the rural and small town poor. From 1935 to 1944, the photographers hired by the FSA took photos, which were used to draw support for impoverished farmers. The images taken in this campaign were often published in popular magazines and are credited with creating the perception of the Great Depression held today. Wolcott took this picture, and two others, of the Oakley family working with tobacco. One is of Mrs. Oakley, barefoot, hanging the tobacco.

Mrs. Oakley

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA-OWI Collection

Another photo of the Oakley family is of the Oakley’s eight-year old daughter stripping and tying the tobacco in their bedroom since it had become too cold for them to work outside.

Oakley Daughter

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA-OWI Collection

These photos were taken in 1939, the year after Dr. Raymond Pearl published the first report stating that non-smokers lived longer than smokers. While this fact would be debated for many years, it marked a significant moment in the tobacco industry.

Through April 8, 2012, you can visit the Weatherspoon Art Museum to see the photo of the Oakley family (from the Weatherspoon’s collection) and try to figure out for yourself what their life was really like, in the To What Purpose? Photography as Art and Document exhibition in Gallery 6.

The Library of Congress also has over 160,000 of the FSA photos published online at the following website.

Post written by Stephanie Krysiak, a second year History Master’s student at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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The Final 3

 
Kate Gilmore's "Wall Bearer"

"Wall Bearer" performers

Time has just flown by and now we are down to the final three live performances of Kate Gilmore‘s Wall Bearer at the Weatherspoon.  I wanted to take this opportunity to say thank you to the artist and all of the performers  of this work, who have been so amazing to get to know.

Here’s a picture of the whole group!  Back row (left to right): Jennifer Schenck, Heather Flow, Rebecca Henderson, Mary Piepmeier, Kate Gilmore, Valerie Osipova, and Diana Dau. Front row (left to right): Tiffany Littlejohn, Claire Wardlaw, Melanie Harris, Katie Tyler, Kim Yancey, Gracelee Lawrence, and Arleen Westmoreland.

The dates and times for the final performances of Wall Bearer are:

Thursday, December 1, 3:30-6:30 pm

Saturday, December 3, 2-5 pm

Saturday, December 10, 2-5 pm

We are also excited to see a review of Persona: A Body in Parts by Tom Patterson in the Winston Salem Journal.

- posted by the exhibition’s Curator, Xandra Eden

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