Triplette Foundation Lecture: Rania Matar, Photographer

Apr 4, 6pm - 7pm

Triplette Foundation Lecture: Rania Matar, Photographer photo

As a Lebanese-born American woman and mother, Rania Matar’s photographs explore both sides of her ethnic background, cross-cultural experience, and personal narrative, in addressing issues of personal and collective identity. Photographing girls and women both in the United States where she lives, and in the Middle East where she is from, Matar focuses on notions of identity and individuality, within the context of an underlying universality of these experiences. 

 In her work, Matar seeks to focus essence, our physicality and on the commonalities that make us human, to emphasize underlying similarities rather than apparent differences. At the Weatherspoon, she will talk about her experiences of living through wars and her current interaction with Syrian and Palestinian refugees in Lebanon. While her photographs may not provide answers or solutions, she hopes that they can act as moments of contemplation, encouraging the viewer to find beauty in our shared humanity.

Rania Matar trained as an architect at the American University of Beirut and at Cornell University, she later studied photography at the New England School of Photography and the Maine Photographic Workshops. Matar started teaching photography in 2009 and offered summer photography workshops to teenage girls in Lebanon's refugee camps with the assistance of non-governmental organizations. She now teaches at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. A mid-career retrospective of Matar’s work, titled In Her Image, is on view at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, until June 2018.  

http://www.raniamatar.com

This lecture is supported by the generosity of the Triplette Foundation and the School of Art through which renowned photographers are brought to campus annually to lecture and meet with students to discuss current issues in photography. 

Image: Rania Matar, Soraya and Tala, Yarze, Lebanon, from the series: Unspoken Conversations (detail), 2014, inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist.

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